us-policy

Empty Rhetoric in the Obama Administration’s Iran Policy

U.S. President Barack Obama reviews an honor guard upon his arrival in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on March 28, 2014. Obama met with Saudi King Abdullah during his visit to the region. (Reuters)
 

The Obama administration has often responded to crises of confidence in its foreign policy by treating unease and skepticism among international allies and partners, and among critics at home, as a messaging problem. It has interpreted failure to secure buy-in or cooperation as a failure to communicate effectively, rather than as a potential sign of flawed substance.

Sanctions on Iran: Reactions and Impact

Bandar-e-Abbas, (Photo by Ivan Milnaric, available at Flickr)

Gasoline Sanctions on Iran: How Will Tehran Respond?

A woman stands in the middle of Haft-e Tir Square in Tehran. (Photo by kamshots, available at Flickr)

 

Iran Policy: Sanctioned Individuals & Entities

U.S. Department of the Treasury Building (photo by tomasland, available at flickr).
 

Sources (adapted from):

[1] United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1737, 1747, and 1803 (available at http://www.iaea.org/NewsCenter/Focus/IaeaIran/index.shtml).

[2] U.S. Department of Treasury press releases (available at http://www.treas.gov/press/).

[3] U.S. Department of State (available at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/index.htm).

U.S. Policy Toward Iran's Nuclear Program

(Oval Office, Official White House photo by Pete Souza)
 

What Iran Really Thinks About Talks


On Apr. 9, Gholam Reza Aghazadeh, the head of Iran's atomic energy agency, announced that the Islamic Republic had installed 7,000 centrifuges in its Natanz uranium enrichment facility. The announcement came one day after the U.S. State Department announced it would engage Iran directly in multilateral nuclear talks.

U.S. Policy

Here, IranTracker provides an overview of U.S. policy towards Iran, particularly Iran's nuclear program. This background and tracking information is critical to understanding the evolution of the complex debate in Washington over policy towards Iran.

In this section

Empty Rhetoric in the Obama Administration’s Iran Policy
By Maseh Zarif, April 7, 2014

The Obama administration has often responded to crises of confidence in its foreign policy by treating unease and skepticism among international allies and partners, and among critics at home, as a messaging problem. It has interpreted failure to secure buy-in or cooperation as a failure to communicate effectively, rather than as a potential sign of flawed substance. 

America VS. Iran: The Competition for the Future of the Middle East
By Frederick W. Kagan, January 13, 2014

This new AEI report analyzes US soft-power strategies in the Middle East and advocates for the restructuring of US foreign assistance to better check the advance of the Islamic Republic.

Bush's Disastrous Flip Flop

 

Press and pundits applauded George Bush's decision last month to send a representative to Geneva to join a meeting with Iran's nuclear negotiator. Barack Obama, the 2008 presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, said, "Now that the United States is involved, it should stay involved with the full strength of our diplomacy." Sen. John Kerry, the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, said the decision might be "the most welcome flip flop in diplomatic history."

Now Bush Is Appeasing Iran

 

AEI resident scholar Michael Rubin explains how the Bush administration's recent diplomatic pirouette toward Iran will not only undercut the efficacy of United Nations sanctions, but also prop up a regime beset by a host of economic problems.