Islamic Republic of Iran

Israel-Iran Foreign Relations

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Afghanistan-Iran Foreign Relations

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Clinton’s Latin America Trip: Iran’s Return on Soft Power Investment in the Region?

President Ahmadinejad and President Lula de Silva (Available at Wikimedia Commons).

 

Latin America continues to serve as a battleground in the discussions of sanctions against Iran’s nuclear program. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s recent trip to the region suggests that this battle continues in earnest. Brazil’s refusal to support sanctions against Iran despite the Clinton visit indicates that Iran has perhaps received a return on its soft power investment in Brazil and other Latin American states.

 

Uruguay-Iran Foreign Relations

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Economic Relationship:

Uruguay and Iran have a good bilateral trade relationship, as Uruguay has been an important contributor to Iran’s recent increase in trade relations with Latin America.  Uruguay is a major supplier of rice, wool, skins, and occasionally beef to Iranian markets.[1] 

Paraguay-Iran Foreign Relations

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Nuclear:

Guatemala-Iran Foreign Relations

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Economic Relationship: 

In late February 2010, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton began a tour of Latin American that included Guatemala, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, and Uruguay. A week before her departure Clinton announced, “I’m on my way to Latin America next week. And Iran is at the top of my agenda.”[1]

 

Cuba-Iran Foreign Relations

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Nuclear:

Costa Rica-Iran Foreign Relations

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Economic Relationship:

In late February 2010, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton began a tour of Latin American that included the countries Costa Rica, Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, and Guatemala. A week before her departure Clinton announced, “I’m on my way to Latin America next week. And Iran is at the top of my agenda.”[1]

Mauritania-Iran Foreign Relations

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Economic Relationship:

Senegal-Iran Foreign Relations

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Nuclear:

Senegal’s President Adoulaye Wade publicly told Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad that he endorses Iran’s right to nuclear power for peaceful purposes in November 2009.  Wade explained that he believed Ahmadinejad’s assurances that Iran did not seek to use uranium for anything but civilian nuclear purposes.[1]